David Jeffery Site


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Sections

  1. Vita and Personal Key Links
  2. Courses Taught or in Preparation and Problem Books
  3. Science Links Including My Own Online Works
  4. Recent Online Papers and Talks
  5. Arts, Books, Literature
  6. Holiday Greetings
  7. Bookmarks Just a generally useful set.
  8. Favorites Firefox bookmarks plus other stuff too.
  9. University sites
  10. Moves
  11. Playlist
  12. Biography, Research Interests, Hobbies in brief.
  13. Publications with a few errors and duplications that I'm working on correcting.
  14. tmpp.pdf
  15. UNLV mail
  16. Wikipedia
  17. Wiktionary
  18. You Tube


  1. Vita and Personal Key Links

    1. David Jeffery: Vita in pdf as of 2021jan01. See also the noi version and separate Teaching Philosophy.
    2. David Jeffery: Vita in html and papers Badly outdated.
    3. David Jeffery: Schedule 2010 Spring.
    4. David Jeffery: Addresses Not updated very often.
    5. David Jeffery: Bookmarks Not updated very often.
    6. tmpp.pdf A temporary file of some kind.


  2. Courses Taught or in Preparation and Problem Books

  3. The following are links to the course web sites. Most of these I have actually taught, but a few sites were set up when I just had ideas in mind for courses: those are the courses in preparation. The web sites are only updated when courses are being taught or are in development.

    I have developed problem books for many of the courses. These are in PDF files linked below. They include only problems. See Problem Books for Course Instructors for how to obtain the source files for the problems and the problem-selection software. The source files are only available to course instructors.

    1. Astronomy: Introductory: Introductory astronomy for non-science students. The Solar System and Stars, Galaxies, and Cosmology. The problem book of multiple-choice problems is Introductory Astronomy Problems: it is extensive enough for a for all usual topics covered in introductory astronomy courses. I have prepared a nearly complete set of online Introductory Astronomy Web Lectures Here are the contents. There is sufficient material for two courses: 1) The Solar System; 2) Stars, Galaxies, and Cosmolgy.

    2. Astronomy: History: A history of astronomy course for non-science students. The current site html file is just a placeholder until I teach the course again. The course was taught last in 1996summer which was before I had become web-savvy. A problem book exists for this course, but it is in an old style which I can no longer print without updating the book. This will be done whenever I teach the course again. I was preparing a TeX book Lectures on the History of Astronomy. If the course is ever revived, this material will be transmuted into html lectures with lots of images.

    3. Astronomy: Introductory Astronomy Laboratory: This course is an introductory astronomy laboratory course for non-science students that complements a lecture course in astronomy either for stars and cosmology or planetary systems.

    4. Astrophysical Radiative Transfer: A senior level introduction to astrophysical radiative transfer. The problem book of multiple-choice and full-answer problems is Radiative Transfer Problems for Astrophysics. This book is NOT yet extensive enough for a full course.

    5. Classical Mechanics (Graduate or Senior): Classical mechanics at the Goldstein level. The problem book of multiple-choice and full-answer problems is Classical Mechanics Problems. This book is NOT yet extensive enough for a full course.

    6. Conceptual Physics: This is a course for non-science students that originally used texbook Conceptual Physics, Paul G. Hewitt. In the future, I intend to to use online lectures of my own devising similar in style to my online Introductory Astronomy Web Lectures. For conceptual physics, I have developed a problem book of multiple-choice and full-answer problems Conceptual Physics Problems. This book is NOT yet extensive enough for a full course.

    7. Cosmology (Graduate or Senior or Junior): An introductory cosmology course at the graduate level.

    8. Condense Matter (undergrad): I've never taught this course, but I have begun a website based anticipation of one day teaching a similar course. This is not likely to eventuate.

    9. Energy and Physics: A science and society course about energy in physics and society. At present this is not a full course, but just a third of a course in the form of a course module which has been taught. The problem book of multiple-choice is Problems for a Course on Energy in Physics and Society. This book is NOT yet extensive enough for a full course. I have prepared a few online lectures for the module that form a basis for a full online set of lectures: Energy in Physics and Society: the link is currently just to the schedule of the module: lectures 1, 3, 4, and 5 exist. For a full course, the existing lectures may in some cases need to be cannabalized.

    10. Introductory Physics Algebra-Based: Non-calculus based introductory physics at the Cutnell & Johnson level. The problem book of multiple-choice and full-answer problems is Introductory Physics Problems: it is extensive enough for a for usual two semesters of introductory physics. The book is also for the intro physics calculus-based course.

    11. Introductory Physics Calculus Based: Two semesters at the Halliday, Resnick, & Walker level. The problem book of multiple-choice and full-answer problems is Introductory Physics Problems: it is extensive enough for a for usual two semesters of introductory physics. The book is also for the intro physics algebra-based course. There is a set of online lectures in pdf format Introductory Physics Lectures that is in development. These lectures will one day replace the need for a textbook.

    12. Introductory Physics Laboratories NAU: This site is currently set up for the laboratories at NAU. It has to be updated for other institutions.

    13. Introductory Physics Laboratories UNLV (AKA phylab):

    14. Mathematical Physics: The standard junior level mathematical physics course at the Arfken level. I am currently beginning a set of online Mathematical Physics Lectures which are about 1 % done. There is a book of multiple-choice and full-answer problems Mathematical Physics Problems. The book is a work in progress. I have also been preparing a set of Mathematical Tables for use with this and other advanced courses. This is a choice set. It cannot compete in quantity with The Wolfram Function Site and Wikipedia: Table of Integrals and other online resources. In fact, I may just give up on it if I can find links and printable versions of everything online.

    15. Modern Physics: The standard junior level modern physics course. The problem book of multiple-choice and full-answer problems is Modern Physics Problems. There is another problem book to accompany Brian Greene's The Fabric of the Cosmos (2004) which is being used as complementary text for the course: Greene Problems. The books are works in progress.

    16. Physical Science: Introduction to physical sciences (physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology) for non-science students. For this course for physics and astronomy, I use, respectively, the books Introductory Physics Problems and Introductory Astronomy Problems. A problem book exists for the chemistry part, but it is in an old style which I can no longer print without updating the book. This will be done whenever I teach the course again. I guess I always pretty much skipped geology, except for what gets included under astronomy which is quite a bit.

    17. Quantum Mechanics (Undergrad): Two semesters of introductory undergraduate quantum mechanics at the Griffiths level. The problem book of multiple-choice and full-answer problems is Quantum Mechanics Problems. It is quite extensive, but probably not adequate in some areas.

    18. Quantum Mechanics (Grad): First semester of graduate quantum mechanics. As for the undergraduate quantum mechanics course, the problem book of multiple-choice and full-answer problems is Quantum Mechanics Problems. It is quite extensive, but probably not adequate in some areas.

    19. Seminar : 1-credit hour seminar course.

    20. Stellar Astronomy: 3-credit hour seminar course. I've not taught this course. This is a course astronomy majors or grad should have at some point to fill in the gaps---huge gaps---in their training.


  4. Science Links Including My Own Online Works

    1. aalib A library of fortran95 procedures that I've created for my personal use. I hereby give blanket permission for personal, educational, or research use to anyone who would like to use them: express permission is not required, but I retain copyright.
      ---No guarantees, no documentation, no index file.
      ---Read the aalib.f file for a short description.
      ---Files with an extra t at the end of the name are test programs of the procedures.
      ---Files with an extra t at the start of the name are test programs for trivial things.
    2. Astro Links
    3. Astronomy My encyclopedia site for astronomy, general physics, science, and technology. Now pretty much outdated by Wikipedia, but there are still interesting collections of images including those of my own devising.
    4. Astronomy Conferences provided by Liz Bryson of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation.
    5. Days of the Year
    6. Grotrian diagrams
    7. My Crank Idea
    8. Nobel Prize
    9. Pedagogy links
    10. Physics Links
    11. References These are many references that I have used. Many are just physics and astronomy text books. But philosophy, history, biography, and other works are listed too.
    12. The Russell Frank Astronomy Lecture Series at University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    13. SM The SM (or SuperMongo) plotting package
    14. Supernova-Relevant Conferences
    15. Supernova Folk
    16. SUSPEND SUpernova Spectra and other Supernova-Relevant Data PENDing further analysis. My own supernova database.
    17. Talk, 2013 Apr16 A journal club talk.


  5. Recent Online Papers and Talks

    1. Note on Spectrum Modeling of Nebular SNe Ia in preparation.
    2. Cell Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer A slowing growing draft of a ``revolutionary'' new Monte Carlo radiative transfer method.
    3. A Study of Energy Deposition Estimators for Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer. A nearly finished paper on a detail of Monte Carlo radiative transfer. I gave job talk on this paper at Trinity College Dublin in 2005nov.
    4. Giant Steps Papers and Talks.
    5. On SN 2003fg: The Probable Super-Chandrasekhar-Mass SN Ia Revised preprint.
    6. A Review of Supernova Atmosphere Modeling: Radiative Transfer and All That given at MARAC: MidAmerican Regional Astrophysics Conference as of last update, 2007 April 13--14. Never quite completed. See also conference images at MARAC Images.
    7. My Teaching Philosophy A review of me for a seminar at the University of South Florida, Tampa, 2007 April 9-10. Scroll down a ways to see some words. It didn't quite dare to give a blank-screen talk. To see the all words, view source.
    8. 29 Hours in Edinburg, Texas A Visit to the University of Texas Pan-American, Edinburg, Texas, 2007 February 9--10.


  6. Arts, Books, Literature

    1. Alien cartoons
    2. Art sites
    3. Film sites
    4. International Folk Dance Groups
    5. Playlist
    6. Poems and Three Plays by yours truly.
    7. Quotes
    8. Ulysses in Hell
    9. Writers and Works Well this site has been completely outdated by Wikipedia: Lists of Writers.
    10. Works


  7. Holiday Greetings

    1. New Year's Eve and Day: December 31 & January 1
    2. February 14: Valentine's Day
    3. March 17: St. Patrick's Day
    4. March 21/22: Spring Solstice
    5. May 21: Veteran's Day
    6. June 21/22: Summer Solstice
    7. October 31: Halloween
    8. Tiddles Day
    9. December 21/22: Winter Solstice
    10. December 25: Christmas Greeting
    11. files